Home Pre-purchase Consultation

Ensure to buy a good home and avoid one that would negatively impact your life.

Pre-purchase/ Pre-Lease Consultation – from $210 

Two factors can make or break a home – and your living experiences in it:

  • The energies coming into the entrance, main windows and frequently used doors;
  • The quality of energy in the bedrooms.

We are mostly concerned to eliminate any of the small numbers of properties that cannot be ‘made good’ and would create ongoing struggles. We understand that no home is ever 100% perfect and that you have personal requirements and other pressures.

The entrances and bedrooms are the most important aspects to take care of. For instance, if the energy at a main door is negative, you will get a dull heavy home and may have finance issues there. If your bedrooms have negative energies, these may contribute to sleeping trouble and long term sickness.

In the pre-purchase consultation, we make sure that a proposed home has the potential to be made right for your situation. You will get a report detailing the most important energies and their implications. If you go ahead with the purchase, we recommend a full consultation to help you determine right placement, colours and decor that will enhance its best energies.

Prices

  • $210 one storey, $240 two stories or 4+ BR home (Remote analysis). For this, your proposed property needs to be visible on Google Maps. This enables us to get its exact compass orientation. We reserve the right to not provide this analysis if this measurement is borderline.
  • Onsite: $330 one storey, $360 two storey home. Properties more that 25km from the CBD will attract extra travelling charges.

You will receive a written summary report, and if needed on the spot verbal, report via phone or email. This will outline the main features and energies of this property.

Should you purchase an assessed property and require a full Feng Shui analysis, the price of the prepurchase analysis will be taken off the Feng Shui consultation price.

To conduct the pre-purchase consultation, we will need:

  1. The address of the proposed property;
  2. The 20-year period in which the building was built. If there have been major renovations, additions or refurbishments, I need the age period of these too. Periods are: …, 1904-1923; 1924-1943; 1944-1963; 1964-1983; 1984-2003; after 2004.
  3. A floor plan
  4. The birth dates of all family members.

When looking for a new home, use your instincts. Listen to your first impressions – they are often very accurate. Don’t rationalise these away. Once you have located a home you can see yourself living in, contact us for a pre-purchase consultation.

A pre-purchase Feng Shui consultation will give you certainty that your new home will support you.

Payments

Payments need to be made prior to the pre-purchase consultation unless otherwise arranged. Please request an invoice. You can pay via cheque or direct deposit.

For international clients, you may also pay by PayPal from where you can send money safely and instantly online.)

Articles & Updates

Home Office Feng Shui

Home Office Feng Shui

Many of us work from home now. This comes with a new set of opportunities as well as a new a set of challenges, especially if your home was not designed for you to work there. Here are some Feng Shui tips to help you make working from home, work...

Good Feng Shui Design

Good Feng Shui Design

Three things that should be in for your house design to work  As above so below, as below so above!  Following design principles are universal. They apply to a building at large, a unit, and also scale down to a room, a corner or a workspace, and...

I find that we don’t give windows enough thought! They let in light, air and if we are lucky a good view, but there is more:

In Feng Shui we consider windows to be the eyes of the building. They should be designed to purpose and positioned to let in positive life energy. They are our connection to the world. Just as our eyes are windows to the Soul, right windows can make buildings soulful. We should give them special consideration. 
 

What a Window can do

I have a strong memory of women and older people in my German hometown with a pillow under their elbows leaning on the sill of an open window, enjoying the sun, watching kids play and the world go by. Open windows were places for connecting socially the inside with the outside. They were also used to call on those outside.

I find that being able to hang your head out of a window is something special. You are inside, but feel the air outside, can look up and down the street or landscape, smell the flowers or the wet pavement, or exchange a few words with a neighbour without having to move. It is a private-public interface.

I also enjoy a seat by a window - either open or closed depending on the weather. It is a special spot to hang out, to watch people, clouds or trees. And also a good spot for reading. It changes the quality of being home alone.

Interestingly today, windows are more like invisible screens. We are more likely to be separated by them or behind them, or in the other extreme, we remove them altogether when we want to bring the outside in, which can end up in unprotected spaces that are too exposed.

The Flyscreen  

When I came to Australia, I remember being quite dismayed by the windows.

They weren’t the windows I’d known but covered by fly screens. No more hanging the head out, but instead looking at the world through a mesh barrier. No more really fresh air - fly screens reduce the air’s life force by charging it up and filtering its flow. And they collect dust.

In every of my homes, I helped myself by removing the flyscreens from half of our windows. You can do this in many locations where there are hardly any insects during the day. Taking off the screens was always a relief, restoring my sense of connection, healthy energy and fresh air.

I invite you to try this where possible - in winter or where you don’t have a fly or mosquito problem. That way you are able to really let in life force and positive Feng Shui energies.
 

Right Window Types

When choosing windows we seem to be guided by external looks rather than the function of an individual space. We go for uniform windows and care more about symmetry and conformity than to work out what would make us feel good there.

To get a window that works, you need assess what your individual needs and functions are in each room and choose windows that can facilitate that.

Incidentally, the best window to let in fresh air and to hang your head out are casement windows. They are either single or double windows that are hinged at the side and fully open. They are my favourite windows. You can breathe the air, watch the birds or spend time day dreaming in your window seat.

Double-hung and sliding windows on the other hand only open half of their area. The other half is always shut. They don’t provide the same exhilarating experience - and their mechanisms can get stuck. They can however be securely bolted open for a slit of fresh air.

Awning windows are very popular and very annoying. They are hinged at the top and wind open at the bottom, but don’t open more than a few hand widths. They are inadequate for communication with the outside, but handy to let in a steady stream of air, which is good in some situation such as over the kitchen stove. They can also be kept open when it is raining.

Louvre windows also keep the rain out - if tilted the right way. I love them in the right place. I have an almost full height narrow louvre window on the south (cold) side of the house in order to direct a cooling breeze through it on a hot day. The panes can be adjusted to direct the air up or down. But they are not to hang the head out either.
 

The window that’s not there

Have you ever run against the pane of a full sized door or window thinking it was open? I have - even though it had some pale markings to show that there was glass there. Somehow, we have made it an objective to pretend that windows are not there by making them invisible, ie by constructing them without or with only minimal frames or glazing bars.

This is bad Feng Shui. Windows are meant to be there and have frames. Research shows, that we appreciate a view much more if it is framed. It becomes like a piece of art. We feel even more comfortable if a window has many panes, rather than when gaping at an undefined expanse.

In permaculture we refer to the meeting of two surfaces (such as the glass and the building) as edge. Edges should be beautiful and emphasised. This facilitates communication and life across it. The thicker the edge or the frame of a window the more comfortable we feel. Have a look at various houses and their windows and note your emotional response.
 

Right Size

We like big windows and often have a wall of windows and glass doors separating our living area from the garden or a view. This may be appropriate but can also result in a living area too open, lacking definition, cosiness and comfort.
We need to get this balance right, based on our needs and lifestyle. The more public a space, the larger windows you want there, the more private, the smaller they should be. 

One particular bugbear of mine are floor to ceiling windows in the wrong place, such as in bedrooms and some studies. With such windows you can see into the room from the outside, which may not be appropriate.

I remember a situation where when sitting at the desk, one could look up your legs from a public driveway, or another where people could see your the bed from the road - all because the windows came right down to the floor. You end up closing your curtains altogether in these situations.

In both of these cases, a normal height window with a bit of wall below would have protected you. With them you can be private and sit at your desk in your undies or lie in bed enjoying the sun without needing to shut the curtains - and from the outside you can only see the ceiling of the room.
 

How to Select Windows

Don’t make the selection of windows a rote decision. Each window has a right place, right size, dimension, right way of opening, etc. Take time to feel into the space and get each window to do what you want it to do.

Last Word

Keep your windows clean. Being the eyes of the building you don’t want their vision clouded or dusty fly screens. Dirty windows reduce the quality of the Yang energy coming through them.

For help with your design, call  
Brigitte Seum, 0403 366 100.

 

 

Image Rob Wingate on unsplash

Home Office Feng Shui

Home Office Feng Shui

Many of us work from home now. This comes with a new set of opportunities as well as a new a set of challenges, especially if your home was not designed for you to work there. Here are some Feng Shui tips to help you make working from home, work better for you.  ...

Good Feng Shui Design

Good Feng Shui Design

Three things that should be in for your house design to work  As above so below, as below so above!  Following design principles are universal. They apply to a building at large, a unit, and also scale down to a room, a corner or a workspace, and even scale up to the...

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‘7 Steps to a Life-supporting Building’

The inside guide to life force in our buildings

I find that we don’t give windows enough thought! They let in light, air and if we are lucky a good view, but there is more:

In Feng Shui we consider windows to be the eyes of the building. They should be designed to purpose and positioned to let in positive life energy. They are our connection to the world. Just as our eyes are windows to the Soul, right windows can make buildings soulful. We should give them special consideration. 
 

What a Window can do

I have a strong memory of women and older people in my German hometown with a pillow under their elbows leaning on the sill of an open window, enjoying the sun, watching kids play and the world go by. Open windows were places for connecting socially the inside with the outside. They were also used to call on those outside.

I find that being able to hang your head out of a window is something special. You are inside, but feel the air outside, can look up and down the street or landscape, smell the flowers or the wet pavement, or exchange a few words with a neighbour without having to move. It is a private-public interface.

I also enjoy a seat by a window - either open or closed depending on the weather. It is a special spot to hang out, to watch people, clouds or trees. And also a good spot for reading. It changes the quality of being home alone.

Interestingly today, windows are more like invisible screens. We are more likely to be separated by them or behind them, or in the other extreme, we remove them altogether when we want to bring the outside in, which can end up in unprotected spaces that are too exposed.

The Flyscreen  

When I came to Australia, I remember being quite dismayed by the windows.

They weren’t the windows I’d known but covered by fly screens. No more hanging the head out, but instead looking at the world through a mesh barrier. No more really fresh air - fly screens reduce the air’s life force by charging it up and filtering its flow. And they collect dust.

In every of my homes, I helped myself by removing the flyscreens from half of our windows. You can do this in many locations where there are hardly any insects during the day. Taking off the screens was always a relief, restoring my sense of connection, healthy energy and fresh air.

I invite you to try this where possible - in winter or where you don’t have a fly or mosquito problem. That way you are able to really let in life force and positive Feng Shui energies.
 

Right Window Types

When choosing windows we seem to be guided by external looks rather than the function of an individual space. We go for uniform windows and care more about symmetry and conformity than to work out what would make us feel good there.

To get a window that works, you need assess what your individual needs and functions are in each room and choose windows that can facilitate that.

Incidentally, the best window to let in fresh air and to hang your head out are casement windows. They are either single or double windows that are hinged at the side and fully open. They are my favourite windows. You can breathe the air, watch the birds or spend time day dreaming in your window seat.

Double-hung and sliding windows on the other hand only open half of their area. The other half is always shut. They don’t provide the same exhilarating experience - and their mechanisms can get stuck. They can however be securely bolted open for a slit of fresh air.

Awning windows are very popular and very annoying. They are hinged at the top and wind open at the bottom, but don’t open more than a few hand widths. They are inadequate for communication with the outside, but handy to let in a steady stream of air, which is good in some situation such as over the kitchen stove. They can also be kept open when it is raining.

Louvre windows also keep the rain out - if tilted the right way. I love them in the right place. I have an almost full height narrow louvre window on the south (cold) side of the house in order to direct a cooling breeze through it on a hot day. The panes can be adjusted to direct the air up or down. But they are not to hang the head out either.
 

The window that’s not there

Have you ever run against the pane of a full sized door or window thinking it was open? I have - even though it had some pale markings to show that there was glass there. Somehow, we have made it an objective to pretend that windows are not there by making them invisible, ie by constructing them without or with only minimal frames or glazing bars.

This is bad Feng Shui. Windows are meant to be there and have frames. Research shows, that we appreciate a view much more if it is framed. It becomes like a piece of art. We feel even more comfortable if a window has many panes, rather than when gaping at an undefined expanse.

In permaculture we refer to the meeting of two surfaces (such as the glass and the building) as edge. Edges should be beautiful and emphasised. This facilitates communication and life across it. The thicker the edge or the frame of a window the more comfortable we feel. Have a look at various houses and their windows and note your emotional response.
 

Right Size

We like big windows and often have a wall of windows and glass doors separating our living area from the garden or a view. This may be appropriate but can also result in a living area too open, lacking definition, cosiness and comfort.
We need to get this balance right, based on our needs and lifestyle. The more public a space, the larger windows you want there, the more private, the smaller they should be. 

One particular bugbear of mine are floor to ceiling windows in the wrong place, such as in bedrooms and some studies. With such windows you can see into the room from the outside, which may not be appropriate.

I remember a situation where when sitting at the desk, one could look up your legs from a public driveway, or another where people could see your the bed from the road - all because the windows came right down to the floor. You end up closing your curtains altogether in these situations.

In both of these cases, a normal height window with a bit of wall below would have protected you. With them you can be private and sit at your desk in your undies or lie in bed enjoying the sun without needing to shut the curtains - and from the outside you can only see the ceiling of the room.
 

How to Select Windows

Don’t make the selection of windows a rote decision. Each window has a right place, right size, dimension, right way of opening, etc. Take time to feel into the space and get each window to do what you want it to do.

Last Word

Keep your windows clean. Being the eyes of the building you don’t want their vision clouded or dusty fly screens. Dirty windows reduce the quality of the Yang energy coming through them.

  

Brigitte Seum, 0403 366 100.

 

 

Image Rob Wingate on unsplash

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