I have spent the last six months building a tiny house. I set myself the challenge of putting all the living building principles I have gathered and taught over the last 25 years together – within the constraints of a very small space. 

I had explored the idea of tiny houses for a while but had found many quite constrained, often with linearly aligned functions akin to being on a railway platform. I wanted to achieve an overall sense of space, as well as a series of functionally distinct areas that could contain each activity without feeling constrained within it. 

As well as that, I wanted it to be alive, homey and ‘me’, ie. a comfortable third skin and healthy space I would love being in, that would moderate climatic influences and provide a space for the many activities I get into.  

It has been an exercise of filling every nook with purpose. It took 2 years of planning and six months of building – with a builder, occasional specialist contractors and myself on site. It’s been a journey with ups and downs while my visions got battered and moulded into reality – however in the end with very little compromise. 

I am very pleased that it actually turned out as I had imagined it. I’ve got a unique dwelling with a very small footprint. The amazing thing is that it actually feels spacious. It contains functionally separate areas between which I move at different times of the day – the bed cove, the lounge, the kitchen and the work area. There is height that helps provide spaciousness and different levels for different functions. 

It utilises natural materials that do not charge up electrically (painted walls and surfaces normally do) which also contribute to the sense of spaciousness, but more of this another time.  

I have been coaching people to design their home or workspace for a long time. I have always stressed the importance of balance between Yin and Yang, containment and openness. I was, however, not sure if I could succeed in doing this in a very small space. 

I am so pleased that it can be done. Harmonious balance and integrity can be scaled from the very small to the large luxury mansion. Needless to say, I feel I have advanced with my design skills in how to integrate connection and flow with the need for containment and making it personal – a Soulspace for every Soul. 

Please be in touch if you would like some design assistance [link: https://soulspace.info/new-house-design/]. 

Recent articles from our blog.

How to Create a Living Building

How to Create a Living Building

Creating Soulspaces Over the last rather quiet years, I’ve been brewing up the next phase of my work with buildings. I’ve been restless with the state of the world, including its buildings. My goal is to take my Feng Shui practice further and bring soul back into ...

Right Colours & Shapes

Right Colours & Shapes

Colours and shapes need to be in harmony with a rooms energies to make it feel good. Each colour and each shape belong to a particular Feng Shui element. For example, greens belong to the Wood element, triangles and red tones are Fire, brown timber furniture is Earth,...

5 Feng Shui Tips for Moving

5 Feng Shui Tips for Moving

Moving is a stressful time. Here are 5 Feng Shui tips to help you create a comfortable home in your new place.     1. Leave your old baggage behind If you are like most people, you have lots stuff. Life changes fast and in the process you collect books, clothes,...

Free Guide

 

7 Feng Shui Secrets for a Soulful Home

A free guide on how to bring comfort and life force into your home.

Please enter your details in the adjacent form for access to the 20-page PDF guide and receive monthly Feng Shui tips. 

We promise to keep your e-mail safe & not spam you. 

Enter in your details for your FREE guide.

1 + 15 =